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Thread: Construction Advice - Lally Column not plumb. Best correction?

  1. #1
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    Default Construction Advice - Lally Column not plumb. Best correction?

    I'm hoping some of you may work in this field and could give some solid advice...

    New home build. This is my "forever" home - I joke that I'll be buried in the backyard. Therefore, I want this place to last the rest of my life and then some. Of course I notice this issue right near the end of the build (we should get temporary CO today). House is drywalled, hardwood has been installed, etc. It's ready to live in.

    I have a structural steel I-beam in the basement. It doesn't fit into the foundation wall - instead, I have 1 lally column on each end. The beam is 14'6" long. Again, only 2 columns...one on each end. Print calls for a 42"x42"x10" footing...not sure if that's the standard or not so for all I know they disregarded that spec. It's also important to note that he put down 2" of rigid foam under the floor, so if I remember properly that's also over the footings.

    I've noticed that one of the columns isn't plumb - it's not bent, it's just not perpendicular to the floor or beam. I can take a measurement, but it really looks to be between 5* and 10* out of whack if I had to guess. It's shifted along the beam - it's still in line with the beam, but looks to be 3-4" over at the top, like it slid along the beam or something. I've attached the floor plan in case it helps. I drew in arrow showing which way the top of the column shifted.

    Builder said he'd correct (hopefully he's true to his word). His two options were:
    1) "whack it" to try and correct it - said it would probably move 1/2" or so at the top. I think it's a good 4" or so shifted at the top, so that won't do much. I am concerned that could just create more issues
    2) He'd cut it out and install another column, bolting the replacement to the floor where the original column was.

    I don't really like either of these options. I had two that came to mind:
    3) I am not planning to finish the basement, so my initial thought is to leave the existing column alone, have him get another column and put it right next to the existing one, and bolt that to the floor so it is still (hopefully)over the footing. My ASSumption is that would give more than enough structural support and I shouldn't get any pushback form him, frankly, as that's the easiest solution for him. My concern is cracking or issues with the cement floor down the road.

    4) The other alternative, in my mind, is that I could request he cut the floor, completely replace the current column (installing directly on the footing as if it were originally done properly), and then pour a patch in the floor. My concern with the complete tearout and replacement with the floor patch is that the house is completed, and I could be subject to settling/drywall cracking, etc.

    I feel like leaving the existing column in place and adding a supplemental next to it, bolted to the floor, would be the most safe option and should be a robust solution. The only negative I could see is potentially cracking the floor now or down the road with it being bolted in place. Also, it could be sitting on foam that I believe is between the footing and floor.

    Any experience/thoughts/recommendations?

    foundation.JPG

  2. #2
    Club Member mikesfastss's Avatar
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    If it were me I would put a temporary in place remove the crooked one and replace it, anchors in the floor will be fine to hold it in place, a lot of old houses didn’t have but a cement nail to keep it in place till the weight held it down.
    mike

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    Club Member wrath's Avatar
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    How far is it actually out? You can check it with a level.

    In all honesty, if it is a piece of 3" diameter .2"+ wall DOM that is securely fastened to the beam I wouldn't worry about it.

    If it were me, and it was no more than say 3" out, and the crookedness really bothered me, I'd...


    Temporarily support the beam.
    Cut off the top of the existing post the appropriate amount (discovered using math).
    Beat the post over with a BFH, or use a hydraulic cylinder on the beam to push it over.

    If it's more than 3" out I'd consider building a sister post that attaches to the wall. I wouldn't want the "floating" floor to be used to hold the beam up.

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    My brother is a structural engineer and I showed him your post and he said he needs pictures of column showing the tilt and pictures of how its connected at the top and bottom.

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    Club Sponsor ReiKo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Driven2slow View Post
    My brother is a structural engineer and I showed him your post and he said he needs pictures of column showing the tilt and pictures of how its connected at the top and bottom.
    THIS RIGHT HERE...

    Do NOT whack it...


    Unfortunately you will get drywall setting and cracks in wall that you can't avoid... Also there is 3 guarantees with concrete... It expensive... It gets hard... It cracks....


    Number 4 sounds best... But it's not as easy as you make it out to be...
    Quote Originally Posted by Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto
    “You cannot invade the mainland United States. There would be a rifle behind each blade of grass.”

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    Club Member derbydad276's Avatar
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    FWIW.... I used to be a service manager for a developer... if its 3 inches out I wouldn't accept it and would correct it

    the columns/stanchions should be a on a footing with no foam and should be within and inch of plumb in the 7 foot or so height ...
    Driven Crazy

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    Thanks guys - I'll get a pic and take measurements tonight.

    Just to clarify - the existing post is not on foam. They poured a footing, set the post and beam...laid down 2" of foam, and then poured the 4" floor. I'll take a measurement to see how out of plumb it truly is, and get a pic to show.

    I appreciate it!

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